Operators Safety Code

OPERATORS SAFETY CODE

The purpose of the operator safety code is to prevent accidents, by the habitual use of safe working methods.

This means that the operator should always be on the alert not only for the apparent hazards, but also for inherent or hidden dangers which the untrained person would not perhaps, recognise.

The purpose of the operator safety code is to prevent accidents, by the habitual use of safe working methods. This means that the operator should always be on the alert not only for the apparent hazards, but also for inherent or hidden dangers which the untrained person would not perhaps, recognise

Only operate equipment for which you are trained and authorised

Always read the manufactures hand book before you operate the equipment

Always carry out pre-shift checks

Obey  the OPERATOR, MANUFACTURERS  and  COMPANY SAFETY CODE.

The operator is responsible for checking that the lift truck is in good working order before using it.

The lift truck operator is responsible to ensure the safety of pedestrians while operating a lift truck.

The operator must not allow anyone to travel on the FLT or any part of the FLT unless the truck has been designed for that purpose.

Do not allow anyone to stand or walk under raised forks.

Keep hands and feet within the confines of the FLT.

Changes in ground surfaces such as wet/dry, icy or  greasy, very smooth, loose surface; inclines, railway lines or gullies can cause instability, loss of adhesion/braking, damage or loss of load. Always drive across railway lines, drainage gullies etc  slowly and, if possible, diagonally.

Travel at a speed consistent with the type of load and general working conditions.

Do not make fast starts or sudden stops.

Slow down at intersections and corners and do not overtake any other vehicle at these points

Sound the horn  (few sharp blasts) when approaching intersections, corners or any blind spots and if possible drive wide to increase visibility When turning ensure there is enough room for the rear and front end swing.

Sound the horn  (few sharp blasts) when approaching intersections, corners or any blind spots and if possible drive wide to increase visibility When turning ensure there is enough room for the rear and front end swing.

If there is oil or fuel spillages clean them up.

Always look in the direction of travel and have a clear view of the way ahead and be aware of overhead obstructions; be sure there is enough  room for safe operations.

When following another truck keep a minimum of three truck lengths from the truck in front.

Check before entering lifts or driving over dock levellers or bridge plates that they are safe and able to take the combined weight of the FLT and load.

If a fault occurs on the fork truck stops immediately and seek assistance.

Do not be distracted and there must be no  skylarking or practical jokes when operating a FLT

Before moving off with a lift truck in any direction the last thing the operator must do is release the hand brake.

In normal circumstances, if the load on the forks obscures your view you should travel in reverse, looking in the direction of travel (except when travelling up a hill then get someone to guide you).

While operating a lift truck if you saw some rubbish laying in a gangway or warehouse location park the truck in a safe place and remove the obstruction.

If a lift truck has to be parked on an incline leave it in the correct parked position and chock  the wheels.

Do not drive or operate a lift truck across inclines as this will reduce sideways stability and the lift truck has a strong possibility to overturn.

When driving an un- laden truck the forks should be set as low as practicable and tilted back.

Rated capacity plates should clearly indicate the weight the lift truck can lift, to what load centre and what height.

Never exceed the lift truck rated capacity.

To comply with the manufacturers stated lifting capacity the lift truck’s mast must be vertical with the truck on level ground.

Before picking up a load check its weight, load centre, the height which the load has to be placed and its condition and security.

The term “load centre” is the measurement given forward from the front face of the fork arms to the centre point of gravity of the load.

The trucks maximum capacity will be reduced when the load centre is increased.

If a side shift is fitted to a lift truck it may reduce the lift trucks lifting capacity, it may reduce visibility, stability and it will require to be repositioned (centrally) after use.

The load centre will be increased when tilting a load forward at height.

Never use the full range of tilt at Height laden or un- laden.

Net weight = the weight of the load.

Gross weight = the weight of the load and the pallet.

In winter months loads stacked outside may be covered in ice and snow, the effect of this will increase the weight of the load.

When handling metal stillages the forks must be positioned as wide as possible to prevent the load slipping sideways.

Ensure the fork arms are set so that they are able to take equal weight on each fork before entering a palletised load.

Apply the parking brake and place into neutral before using any hydraulic controls to ensure the lift truck is stable during the operation of the hydraulic controls and the operator will be able to concentrate on the stacking/de-stacking operation.

When picking up a load ensure it is fully heeled to ensure the load centre is as short as possible to maintain stability, to keep the truck and its load as short as possible for confined areas and to maintain load stability against the fork arms and carriage unless undercutting the load is required.

Undercutting is used when the forks are longer than the pallet and the pallet is adjacent to a wall or another pallet or the pallet cannot be heeled up immediately. Be aware when undercutting of the weight – load centre ratio.

When stacking or de-stacking stop approximately 150mm from the stack/load/rack, apply the parking brake: select neutral before operating the hydraulic controls, adjust the tilt and raise the forks/load.

By stopping approximately 150mm from the stack/load/rack will assist the operator with accuracy, reduce damage and discourage persons walking in-between the lift truck and stack/load/rack.

Apply sufficient back tilt to cater for the type of load and ground conditions when transporting a palletised load. Never use the full range of tilt with the forks raised laden or un-laden (100-150mmm).

The meaning of “free lift “in connection with lift trucks is the distance the forks can be raised before the mast begins to extend.

When sounding the horn make several short blasts.

When parking a lift truck the heels of the forks should be as low as possible and the tips touching the ground.

Comply with highway code

Keep a look out for danger spots

Don’t operate a truck if you are tired or unwell

Wear spectacles if you need them

Don’t attempt to repair equipment yourself

Report all accidents as soon as they occur

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